alders

 


The next deadline for submission
of a grant application is September 15, 2017.

 

 

 

 

 

Soapstone: Celebrating Women Writers

Soapstone provides grants to support ad hoc events and short-term study groups that introduce or offer the opportunity to delve into the work of women writers. All events and study groups are open to the public. Events are free of charge; there is a small fee for study groups, with scholarships available.

Small Grants to Support Events and Study Groups

The application process is simple and the time between applying and notification short.

Click here for general information about the grants.
Click here for information about applying for an event grant.
Click here for information about applying for a study group grant.

Click here to sign up for our monthly newsletter announcing upcoming study groups.

Upcoming study groups:

The fee is $60; scholarships are available. The group is limited to 15. To register, send an email to info@soapstone.org, and a check made out to Soapstone, 622 SE 29th Avenue, Portland, OR 97214.

Entering the House of Munro, led by Natalie Serber
Six Tuesday evenings, 7 to 9
September 19 through October 24

Reading C.D. Wright, led by Wendy Willis
Four Saturday mornings from 10 to 12
September 16 and 30, October 21 and 28

==========================================================

Entering the House of Munro, led by Natalie Serber

Six Tuesday evenings, 7 to 9
September 19 through October 24
ArtSpace Room, TaborSpace, 60th & SE Belmont

Alice Munro has famously said, "A story is not like a road to follow … it’s more like a house. You go inside and stay there for a while, wandering back and forth and settling where you like and discovering how the room and corridors relate to each other, how the world outside is altered by being viewed from these windows. And you, the visitor, the reader, are altered as well by being in this enclosed space, whether it is ample and easy or full of crooked turns, or sparsely or opulently furnished. You can go back again and again, and the house, the story, always contains more than you saw the last time. It also has a sturdy sense of itself of being built out of its own necessity, not just to shelter or beguile you.”

Those of us familiar with the stories of Alice Munro and those of us entering her house for the first time will be beguiled and sheltered by her spaciousness and concision. Whether in rural or urban settings, whether about departures or homecomings, birth or death, Munro’s stories provide us readers with plenty of surprise discoveries and inevitable truths. I was introduced to her work while in graduate school and was both inspired and daunted by her ability to write stories that capture a sweeping life and the decisive moments when a life is changed by a chance meeting, or an opportunity passed by. In this study session, we will read from “Selected Stories,” and discuss the work in terms of both form and content, craft and theme. What a treat to embark upon a deep study of Munro’s evolving revelations on self, women, family, and landscape.  

Natalie Serber is the author of a memoir, Community Chest, and the story collection, Shout Her Lovely Name, a New York Times Notable Book of 2012, a summer reading selection from O, the Oprah Magazine, and an Oregonian Top 10 Book of the Pacific Northwest. Her fiction has appeared in The Bellingham Review, Gulf Coast, Inkwell, and Hunger Mountain.  Essays and reviews have appeared in The New York Times, O, The Oprah Magazine, The Huffington Post, The San Francisco Chronicle, The Oregonian, The Rumpus, Salon, and Fourth Genre.  Natalie has received the John Steinbeck Award, Tobias Wolff Award, and H.E. Francis Award, and has been short listed in Best American Short Stories. She teaches fiction and the personal essay at Marylhurst University, the Attic Institute and at various conferences including Squaw Valley Community of Writers. Natalie received her MFA from Warren Wilson College. She lives in Portland, Oregon. http://www.natalieserber.com

=========================================================

Reading C.D. Wright, led by Wendy Willis
Four Saturday mornings from 10 to 12
September 16 and 30, October 21 and 28
ArtSpace Room, TaborSpace, 60th & SE Belmont

When C.D. Wright died unexpectedly in 2016, she had published over a dozen books, most of which were called poetry collections, though several of them also walked close to the line of experimental novella and lyric essay. Her book, One With Others (2011), won the National Book Critics Circle Award and was nominated for a National Book Award. Two books, ShallCross (2016) and The Poet, The Lion, Talking Pictures, El Farolito, A Wedding in St. Roch, The Big Box Store, The Warp in the Mirror, Spring, Midnights, Fire & All (2016), were published posthumously.

C.D. Wright was born in the Ozark Mountains of Arkansas, and her work returns to her Arkansas home again and again, though she spent most of her adult life in the North, including teaching for much of her career at Brown University in Rhode Island.

C.D. Wright was singular in her voice and her muscularity of language. As Ben Lerner put it after her death: “[S]he was part of a line of mavericks and contrarians who struggled to keep the language particular in times of ever-encroaching standardization. I think of the messy genius of James Agee and Mary Austin as two possible antecedents for her genre-bending, lyrically charged, often outraged and outrageous American English.” She used that fierceness to look at friendship and love and place and race and death. I guess she used it to look at everything.

We will read two books—Deepstep Come Shining, about which Michael Ondaatje said: “For me, C.D. Wright's poetry is river gold. 'Love whatever flows.' Her language is on the page half pulled out of earth and rivers still holding onto the truth of the elements. I love her voice and pitch and the long snaky arms of her language that is willing to hold everything human and angry and beautiful.’”; and One With Others (2010) (“If white people can ride down the highways/with guns in their trucks/I can walk down the highway unarmed”).

Wendy Willis is a poet and essayist living in Portland. Her first book of poems, Blood Sisters of the Republic, was published in 2012, and she has had poems and essays published in Utne ReaderPoetry Northwest, New England Review, Oregon Humanities, ZYZZYVA, and numerous other places. Wendy is also the Executive Director of the Deliberative Democracy Consortium and the Founder and Director of Oregon’s Kitchen Table at Portland State University. Wendy graduated magna cum laude from Georgetown Law Center and holds an M.F.A. in poetry from the Rainier Writing Workshop at Pacific Lutheran University and a B.A. from Willamette University. Wendy’s next book, A Long Late Pledge, will be released in September 2017.

=========================================================

To be notified about these programs and those of many other literary organizations, sign up for our community email announcements that come out every other week with information about readings, workshops and opportunities for readers and writers in Oregon and Southwest Washington.

=========================================================

For a complete list of grants awarded, please click here to see or download a PDF